Avalances.sk

Friday 26.01.2024

Published 25 01 2024, 17:00


Danger level

treeline
Avalanche Problem
Wind slab
Treeline
New snow


High winds with significant precipitation will cause unstable slabs of wind-drifted snow that are deposited on hard ground.

In the Western, High and Western part of the Low Tatras there is an increased avalanche danger above the forest boundary, i.e. the 3rd degree. The main avalanche problem remains wind-blown snow. Strong north-westerly winds, which reached 160 km/h in gusts on Thursday. It has created particularly on the leeward sides under the rock walls and in narrow couloirs wind-beaten slabs, which are deposited on the hard snow cover. These layers are not well interconnected at all. Especially the leeward SE, E, NE and SW orientations will be particularly dangerous. Avalanche release will therefore be possible with only a small additional load; in addition, spontaneous avalanches of medium size may occur during the day. The second avalanche problem is the new snow, which is mainly made up of loose hailstones on hard ground. All exposures are dangerous.

Snowpack

In the last 24 hours the most snow fell in the Western Tatras up to 30cm. It is very unevenly distributed and blown to the windward sides of the ridges under the glass walls or into the forest zone. The ridges of the mountains and the windward sides are blown into the hard and sometimes rocky subsoil. At higher elevations, due to cooler temperatures, the snow is drier and is mainly made up of hailstones, which will form a dangerous layer in the coming days. As the altitude drops, the new snow becomes wetter and becomes soaked through to the hard ground. Despite today's snowfall, the snow cover is well below average at altitudes up to 1200 m above sea level.

Tendency

Significantly rising due to strong winds and expected precipitation.

Compiled By : Pavel Beҕko


Danger level

1000m
Avalanche Problem
Wind slab
1000m


In the eastern part of the Low Tatras and Fatras there is a moderate avalanche danger above 1000 m above sea level. The main avalanche problem is wind-blown snow. The very strong north-westerly wind has created wind-beaten slabs, which are deposited on hard ground, especially on the leeward sides under glass walls and in narrow couloirs. Their loosening is possible on steep slopes with a large additional retraction. Small to medium sized slab avalanches are particularly dangerous. There is virtually no continuous snow cover below 1000 m above sea level, which is why there is a low avalanche danger.

The snow cover is very unevenly distributed due to the strong northwest wind. The mountain ridges and windward sides are blown into a hard, sometimes even grassy base. Much of the new snow is blown into the forest belt. Where there has been less wind activity, there is between 5 and 15 cm of new snow, which is mainly made up of hailstones. These could form a dangerous layer in the snow profile in the coming days. At altitudes of around 900 m above sea level, it was mainly wet snow with rain.

Snowpack

Tendency

Significantly rising due to strong winds and expected precipitation.


Compiled by : Pavel Bet'ko